Norwich Township

Norwich was another stop along the Great Northern Railroad, and was named for the hometown of a Great Northern Railway stockholder, which was Norwich, England.

Norwich is 1,531 feet above sea level.

At one time, Norwich was a busy place. There were two blacksmith shops, one run by John Buettner and another by a Mr. Duffy. There were three general stores, the proprietors of two of them were Mr. Hinengen and Mrs. Shields. There were two lumber yards, one owned by Mr. Shirkey, the other by Mr. Renders. A post office was established there in 1901. There was a bank owned by Eugene Stubbins. Norwich had a hotel with a restaurant, and a livery barn was owned by Irey Kneed. There were two grain elevators, one butcher shop, and a pool hall. There were two hardware store, one owned by John Lund. There was a "Central Office", managed by Mrs. Duckett, with telephones service to town people and farmers. Mr. Pederson had a shoemaker shop. Norwich had a Lutheran and a Presbyterian church. There was a jail, and a schoolhouse that was later moved and built on to, to become the township hall. A printing shop published a newspaper, and Norwich had a doctor living and practicing in town.

Each house then included a garden with rhubarb, horseradish, and winter onions as perennials. Nearly every home kept at least a few chickens to provide eggs and meat, and many of the homes also had a barn to shelter a driving team, one or more saddle horses, and perhaps a cow. There would also be a small pasture alongside the barn where the horses and cows could graze.

The first mail carrier of U.S. mail to Norwich Township was Mr. Kringlee, who also farmed and owned the first well drilling rig in the area. Before that, wells were dug by hand, probably about twenty feet deep. Mr. Kringlee's rural mail deliver was later taken over by Mr. Duckett, who had the Norwich route for many years.

Gophers were common in the area, and Norwich Township paid a bounty of one cent for each gopher tail brought in. This was a popular way for kids to earn spending money, catching them mostly through the use of snares, but some of the more enterprising youngsters were able to procure  gopher traps.

1910

  • May Risk
  • Samuel S. Smith
  • Hans Spilde
  • John Kvame
  • Alfred Boutilier
  • George Geddes
  • Ben Gibbons
  • William Parker
  • Gunder Osjard
  • Bert Stevens
  • Katie and William Mejie
  • William L. Templeton
  • Theodore and Halvor Finneseth
  • Anthony Singer
  • Henry Shaffer
  • Patrick O'Brian
  • John Clark
  • William Stewart
  • Petrine Aamoth
  • Angus Ewerrson
  • Inga Olson
  • John and Bertha Bolstad
  • Arne Kringlee
  • Mary Aakran
  • Lila Sevetson
  • Nels Fimriele
  • Queenie Brown
  • Dora and Adam and William Gansz
  • Agnes and Frank Wallace
  • Alice Dwello
  • William Pierce
  • Harry Johnson
  • John Wurth
  • John and Amanda Stille
  • Frank and Vinnie Middleton
  • Walter and Hattie Duckett
  • John Bradbury
  • Albert Carpenter
  • Frank Gilson
  • Hattie Lockwood
  • William Conrad
  • Emma Lafferty
  • P.O. Brian
  • Catherine Kraft
  • Newell Matthews
  • O.P. Steward
  • S.C. Hughs
  • William Mark Wolover
  • Mary Smith
  • Hattie Groom
  • Harry Johnson
  • Knudt Strom
  • Elmer Dilts
  • Oliver Nelson
  • Walter Templeton
  • Harry Duffy
  • Elmer Blocker
  • John Schmerbauck
  • John and Nancy Sallee
  • John Blair
  • John Spenser
  • E.H. Kendall
  • Ole Hestekin
  • Ole Hovey
  • Herman Parge
  • Melvin Cross
  • Frank Blumfield
  • Carlton Davis
  • J.M. and Ora Justice
  • John Wilson
  • A.M. Axem
  • James McDaniel
  • Evaline Shank
  • Henry Thompson
  • Bert Songer
  • Albert Kelsey
  • Jacob Funk
  • John Heath
  • Wilson Proffitt
  • Ben Habeck
  • Clark Burlingame
  • William Gray
  • Ander Linder
  • Chester Fowler
  • A.G. Stokke
  • Ole O. Berg
  • Ole T. Olson
  • Gertrude Dernmler
© 2012-2013 NODAK.info